On visual deficits following lesioning of the temporal lobe

Temporal lobe lesions cause an impairment in recognizing and remembering forms. In early studies of the effects of large temporal lobe lesions in monkeys (Brown and Schäfer,

Figure 1.6. Lesions of the angular gyrus of the parietal lobe. Ferrier initially interpreted the resultant deficit as blindness. His later study (Ferrier and Yeo, 1884) shows that the monkey was not blind but had a profound deficit in visual guidance of movement following bilateral angular gyrus lesioning. (From Ferrier, 1876.)

Figure 1.6. Lesions of the angular gyrus of the parietal lobe. Ferrier initially interpreted the resultant deficit as blindness. His later study (Ferrier and Yeo, 1884) shows that the monkey was not blind but had a profound deficit in visual guidance of movement following bilateral angular gyrus lesioning. (From Ferrier, 1876.)

1888; Klüver and Bucy, 1938) in addition to other symptoms, there were visual defecits. The specifically visual function of the inferotemporal cortex was further clarified when animals were tested after smaller, more restricted lesions of the temporal lobes were produced. K. L Chow (1951) showed that lesions of the inferotemporal cortex cause a specific impairment in the acquisition and retention of visual discrimination learning. Mishkin (1966) demonstated that the essential input to the inferotemporal cortex is by a series of corticocortical connections originating in the striate cortex.

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