Morphology of the Sylvian fissure and of the planum temporale and their variability

Since the advent of neuroimaging techniques it is of the greatest interest to establish the precise arrangements of cortical areas in different sulci and gyri, especially for regions such as the planum temporale and cytoarchitec-tonic area Tpt. This is of importance also because there is an immense individual variability in the morphology of the Sylvian fissure. A qualitative and quantitative analysis of the variability of this region has been re-

Figure 2.5. Three common types of Sylvian fissure: In A1 and A2 the superior or ascending branch (S) is longer than the inferior branch. In A1 the horizontal ramus (Ho) is relatively long (27.5% of the cases); in A2 the horizontal ramus (Ho) is rather short, but the ascending branch (S) is very long and deep (33.75% of cases). In B the superior ramus (S) is distorted and directed forward (21.25% of cases). The remaining 17.5% of the cases belong to different types.

Figure 2.5. Three common types of Sylvian fissure: In A1 and A2 the superior or ascending branch (S) is longer than the inferior branch. In A1 the horizontal ramus (Ho) is relatively long (27.5% of the cases); in A2 the horizontal ramus (Ho) is rather short, but the ascending branch (S) is very long and deep (33.75% of cases). In B the superior ramus (S) is distorted and directed forward (21.25% of cases). The remaining 17.5% of the cases belong to different types.

Table 2.1

Distribution of major Sylvian fissure types according to hemispheres. Values in each cell indicate number of cases. (Data from Ide et al., 1996. N = 40, @0 males, 20 females; w2 = 8.22, p < 0.05). No significant sex differences were found.

Table 2.1

Distribution of major Sylvian fissure types according to hemispheres. Values in each cell indicate number of cases. (Data from Ide et al., 1996. N = 40, @0 males, 20 females; w2 = 8.22, p < 0.05). No significant sex differences were found.

Was this article helpful?

0 0

Post a comment