The brain code

The cortical representation of pitch and pitch combinations on tonotopic maps is discussed. Together with earlier conclusions concerning voice intonation, harmony and the central dogma, a theoretical argument concerning the code by which the brain stores and transmits emotions is developed. The central dogma outlined in Chapter 2 is unabashedly a dogma - a set of assumptions with diverse empirical support, but, on its own, the dogma is little more than one of several ways of thinking about the...

Bilateral cognition

The starting point for the present simulation is a set of subjective psychological features that are widely acknowledged to be part of the normal human mind. No list of properties will be without controversy, but, as Galin (1996) has argued, a viable definition must include, at the very least, those properties that people frequently indicate are central to their own subjective experience. To leave those properties out of a scientific description is truly to leave out the very topic that...

The coding of human emotions

A bimodal pitch-based theory of emotions is outlined in which emotional valence is either positive or negative. The idealized form of valence is found in the major and minor modes of diatonic music, but a more subtle effect can be found in normal human speech. The relevant literature on intonation is reviewed and a general theory of intonation is discussed. The fundamental argument of this chapter is that the encoding and decoding of human emotions is related to the encoding and decoding of the...

Bihemispheric Dissonance

Role of the cortical neuron integrator or coincidence detector Israel Journal of Medical Science, 18, 83-92. Abercrombie, D. (1967). Elements of General Phonetics. Chicago Aldine Publishing. Alcock, K. J., Wade, D., Anslow, P., & Passingham, R. E. (2000). Pitch and timing abilities in adult left-hemisphere-dysphasic and right-hemisphere-damaged subjects. Brain and Language, 75, 47-65. Aleksander, I. (1996). Impossible Minds My neurons, my consciousness. London Imperial...

The central dogma of human neuropsychology

The hallmark of humanity is the ability to communicate through language. Although the dominance of the left hemisphere has been known for more than a century, neuropsychological studies over the past few decades have shown important language-related functions of the right hemisphere as well. The non-dominant hemisphere's contributions to language are reviewed here, and their implications for a central dogma of psychology are discussed. Since most mammalian species show few, weak or simply no...

Homotopic callosal connectivity

Homotopic Connectivity

The anatomy of the human corpus callosum has been intensively studied (Reeves 1985) and it is known that primary sensory and motor cortical regions characteristically lack callosal fibers, while most of the other parts of human cerebral cortex send and receive commissural fibers (Figure 5-5). The absence of callosal fibers in early sensory cortex is presumably due to the fact that there is no advantage in mixing the sensory stimuli from both the left and right sensory fields at an early stage...