Further Readings

Ching, T. Y. C., Dillon, H., and Byrne, D. (1998). Speech recognition of hearing-impaired listeners: Predictions from audibility and the limited role of high-frequency amplification.

Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 103, 11281140.

Ching, T. Y., Dillon, H., Katsch, R., and Byrne, D. (2001). Maximizing effective audibility in hearing aid fitting. Ear and Hearing, 22, 212-224.

Dubno, J. R., Dirks, D. D., and Schaefer, A. B. (1989). Stop-consonant recognition for normal-hearing listeners and listeners with high-frequency hearing loss: II. Articulation index predictions. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 85, 355-364.

Duggirala, V., Studebaker, G. A., Pavlovic, C. V., and Sher-becoe, R. L. (1988). Frequency importance functions for a feature recognition test. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 83, 2372-2382.

Humes, L. E., Dirks, D. D., Bell, T. S., Ahlstrom, C., and Kincaid, G. (1986). Application of the articulation index and the speech transmission index to the recognition of speech by normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 29, 447-462.

Kamm, C. A., Dirks, D. D., and Bell, T. S. (1985). Speech recognition and the articulation index for normal and hearing-impaired listeners. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 77, 281-288.

Musch, H., and Buus, S. (2001). Using statistical decision theory to predict speech intelligibility: I. Model structure. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 109, 28962909.

Pavlovic, C. V. (1987). Derivation of primary parameters and procedures for use in speech intelligibility predictions. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 82, 413-422.

Pavlovic, C. V. (1993). Problems in the prediction of speech recognition performance of normal-hearing and hearing-impaired individuals. In G. A. Studebaker and I. Hochberg (Eds.), Acoustical factors affecting hearing aid performance (pp. 221-234). Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon.

Pavlovic, C. V., and Studebaker, G. A. (1984). An evaluation of some assumptions underlying the articulation index. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 75, 16061612.

Pavlovic, C. V., Studebaker, G. A., and Sherbecoe, R. L. (1986). An articulation index based procedure for predicting the speech recognition performance of hearing-impaired individuals. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 80, 50-57.

Rankovic, C. M. (1997). Prediction of speech reception for listeners with sensorineural hearing loss. In W. Jesteadt (Ed.), Modeling sensorineural hearing loss. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Rankovic, C. M. (1998). Factors governing speech reception benefits of adaptive liner filtering for listeners with sensori-neural hearing loss. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 103, 1043-1057.

Schroeder, M. (1981). Modulation transfer function: Definition and measurement. Acustica, 49, 179-182.

Studebaker, G. A., Gray, G. A., and Branch, W. E. (1999). Prediction and statistical evaluation of speech recognition test scores. Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, 10, 355-370.

Studebaker, G. A., and Sherbecoe, R. L. (1993). Frequency importance functions for speech recognition. In G. A. Stu-debaker and I. Hochberg (Eds.), Acoustical factors affecting hearing aid performance. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon.

Studebaker, G. A., Sherbecoe, R. L., and Gilmore, C. (1993). Frequency-importance and transfer functions for the Audi-tec of St. Louis recordings of the NU-6 word test. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 36, 799-807.

Zwicker, E. (1961). Subdivision of the audible frequency range into critical bands (Frequenzgruppen). Journal of the Acoustical Society ofAmerica, 33, 248.

Was this article helpful?

0 0
Hearing Aids Inside Out

Hearing Aids Inside Out

Have you recently experienced hearing loss? Most probably you need hearing aids, but don't know much about them. To learn everything you need to know about hearing aids, read the eBook, Hearing Aids Inside Out. The book comprises 113 pages of excellent content utterly free of technical jargon, written in simple language, and in a flowing style that can easily be read and understood by all.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment