Table C10 Probability of an Employment Separation Being Voluntary and Involuntary by Disability Status CPS 19812000

Probability

Voluntary separation Involuntary separation

Year

Disabled

Nondisabled

Disabled

Nondisabled

1981

0.8153

0.6767

0.0786

0.1868

1982

0.7989

0.6816

0.1113

0.1879

1983

0.8052

0.6794

0.0950

0.1921

1984

0.8032

0.6803

0.0952

0.1887

1985

0.7751

0.6854

0.1111

0.1740

1986

0.8056

0.6960

0.0903

0.1727

1987

0.8060

0.7067

0.0903

0.1646

1988

0.8089

0.7073

0.0901

0.1648

1989

0.8496

0.7216

0.1011

0.2219

1990

0.8479

0.7271

0.1067

0.2135

1991

0.8144

0.6655

0.1240

0.2708

1992

0.8067

0.6382

0.1395

0.3057

1993

0.8090

0.6456

0.1428

0.2911

1994

0.7115

0.5848

0.2287

0.3514

1995

0.6811

0.5768

0.2134

0.3498

1996

0.6506

0.5843

0.2532

0.3373

1997

0.7068

0.6145

0.2019

0.2997

1998

0.6533

0.6091

0.2238

0.3133

1999

0.7940

0.6121

0.1621

0.2990

2000

0.7346

0.6338

0.1748

0.2794

NOTE: See notes to table C.9 for definitions of voluntary and involuntary. The characteristics (other than disability) for which the probabilities were calculated were the means corresponding to the entire sample. See Long (1997). Regressions for 1981, 1982, and 1983 contain more limited industry and occupation classifications. Re-gressors included in the multinomial logit analysis included age; age squared; number of weeks worked last year; and industry, occupation, education, female, nonwhite, single, central city, region, and disability dummy variables.

Table C.11 Probability of an Unemployment Spell Being the Result of Losing a Job, Leaving a Job, Reentering the Labor Force, or Newly Entering the Labor Force, by Disability Status, CPS, 1989-2000

Probability

Job loser Job leaver Reentrant New entrant

Year Disabled disabled Disabled disabled Disabled disabled Disabled disabled

Year Disabled disabled Disabled disabled Disabled disabled Disabled disabled

1989

0.4346

0.4890

0.1459

0.1601

0.3974

0.3315

0.0221

0.0194

1990

0.3980

0.5174

0.1753

0.1536

0.4085

0.3081

0.0182

0.0208

1991

0.5041

0.6294

0.1873

0.1283

0.2988

0.2297

0.0099

0.0126

1992

0.5121

0.6721

0.1299

0.1032

0.3474

0.2150

0.0106

0.0096

1993

0.4925

0.6120

0.1671

0.1235

0.3280

0.2535

0.0123

0.0110

1994

0.3996

0.5155

0.1425

0.0975

0.4546

0.3849

0.0033

0.0020

1995

0.4094

0.5358

0.0994

0.1080

0.4780

0.3497

0.0132

0.0065

1996

0.4947

0.5246

0.0681

0.1082

0.4342

0.3647

0.0029

0.0025

1997

0.3269

0.4712

0.0625

0.1180

0.5826

0.4017

0.0280

0.0091

1998

0.4399

0.5030

0.1380

0.1165

0.4192

0.3773

0.0029

0.0032

1999

0.2005

0.4736

0.1852

0.1410

0.6127

0.3844

0.0015

0.0010

2000

0.3662

0.4757

0.1587

0.1393

0.4695

0.3811

0.0055

0.0039

NOTE: The characteristics (other than disability) for which the probabilities were calculated are the means corresponding to the entire sample. See Long (1997). Regress-ors in the multinomial logit analysis included age; age squared; number of weeks worked last year; number of weeks looking last year; and female, single, nonwhite, education, central city, region, and disability dummy variables.

NOTE: The characteristics (other than disability) for which the probabilities were calculated are the means corresponding to the entire sample. See Long (1997). Regress-ors in the multinomial logit analysis included age; age squared; number of weeks worked last year; number of weeks looking last year; and female, single, nonwhite, education, central city, region, and disability dummy variables.

Table C.12 Mean Difference in Expected Duration and Predicted

Expected Duration across Disability Status, CPS, 1981-2000

Predicted expected duration

Mean difference in expected duration

Year

across disability status (weeks) (1)

Disabled (2)

Nondisabled (3)

1981

8.72

24.18

24.20

1982

11.84

27.92

26.79

1983

12.96

37.14

34.43

1984

12.40

31.44

30.52

1985

16.74

33.40

25.55

1986

20.12

26.20

24.57

1987

23.54

32.75

24.81

1988

19.10

25.88

22.07

1989

13.04

26.69

20.81

1990

12.94

22.37

20.56

1991

16.82

27.60

23.82

1992

5.42

32.17

30.84

1993

15.62

36.46

30.25

1994

11.24

37.68

39.56

1995

18.70

41.87

34.27

1996

17.74

47.71

34.19

1997

14.24

32.44

31.81

1998

0.66

22.39

30.03

1999

19.68

32.39

27.90

2000

3.78

30.60

27.64

NOTE: Mean expected duration (used to calculate the difference shown in column 1) is calculated as two times the observed censored search duration at a given point in time, as advocated by Akerlof and Main (1981); this results in a valid representation of completed search spells under the assumption of a steady state. Predicted expected duration (columns 2 and 3) was calculated using coefficient estimates resulting from the estimation of an accelerated failure time model where search duration is assumed to be distributed as a Weibull: E[t,lt,>0;X„p,o-] = exp(X,p)T(1 +ct). See the text to Chapter 5 for definition of terms. The characteristics (other than disability) for which the predicted expected durations were calculated (X) are the means corresponding to the entire sample. See Long (1997). Regressors for the duration analysis included age; age squared; non-labor income; female, single, nonwhite, education, and regional dummies; dummy variables for availability to work, whether searcher wanted a fulltime job, and whether searcher worked last year; and dummy variables for search methods (private agency, public agency, checked with friends, checked with employer, and checked ads), disability status, and search methods interacted with disability status.

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