Boot

Figure 10.13 Sequence for boot showing how letter-sound accentuation helps the child sound out the word

The first five phonics lessons helped the children understand that different consonants could blend with the same vowel and create different words. A story, "Sam and the Boys" (see Appendix C), helped the children grasp this notion as they produced sound forms such as shoo, moo, boo, foo, oof, and others, as their adventures on the road unfolded.

Once the children can sound out simple words like shoo, moo, foo, oof, boo, boot, loop, root, roof, and so forth, we introduce, one at a time, the short vowels. To help the children discriminate one vowel from another, we used two strategies: First, we relate a unique animated action for each vowel. For example, the a sound was related to the elongated mouth posture needed to utter it (see Figure 10.14). Second, the children were taught to feel with the tips of their fingers the way their mouth shapes changed as they uttered the different sounds. This hand-to-mouth strategy turned out to be invaluable as the children learned to turn the heard word into its written form. The range of words taught with these strategies is shown in Table 10.3.

Figure 10.14 Sequence showing the development of (a) the short a sound and (b) the word ash

Figure 10.14 Sequence showing the development of (a) the short a sound and (b) the word ash

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Funny Wiring Autism

Funny Wiring Autism

Autism is a developmental disorder that manifests itself in early childhood and affects the functioning of the brain, primarily in the areas of social interaction and communication. Children with autism look like other children but do not play or behave like other children. They must struggle daily to cope and connect with the world around them.

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