C

FIGURE 9.1 Key dates in ancient surgery and the Oath. bladder stone surgery, and about 400 years after surgeons separated from their nonsurgical colleagues.26 If I will not cut was inserted into the Oath after the invention of bladder lithotomy and the separation of surgeons and before the Oxyrhynchus papyrus, it would appear in all the versions of the text that we know, and time would have allowed the fact of the insertion to be forgotten. We do not have quotations that refer to a surgical...

Loeb Series

Airs, Waters, Places. Epidemics I, 111. The Oath. Precepts. Nutriment. Trans. WHS Jones. Volume I. Cambridge Loeb Classical Library, 1923a. 2. Hippocrates. Prognostic. Regimen in Acute Diseases. The Sacred Disease. The Art. Breaths. Law. Decorum. Physician (Chap. I). Dentition. Trans. WHS Jones. Volume II. Cambridge Loeb Classical Library, 1923b. 3. Hippocrates. On Wounds in the Head. In the Surgery. Fractures. Joints, Mochlicon (Instruments of Reduction). Trans....

Notes

Aeschylus, Oresteia. 2. Hanson VD. Introduction in Thucydides xii. 3. Message on Medical College of Wisconsin Bioethics Discussions, e-mail chat line. Feb. 8, 2002 (used with permission of author). 4. Sulmasy DP. What is an oath and why should a physician swear one Theoret Med & Bioethics 1999 20 329-46. Hasday LR. The Hippocratic Oath as literary text A dialogue between law and medicine. Yale J Health Policy, Law, Ethics 2002 II(2) 299-323. 5. Rosner F. The physician's...

Voluntary And Destructive Injustice In Medicine Today

If this chapter followed the precedent of previous chapters, it would now recount a case in which a physician abused a patient's trust. I have heard of, or read about, physicians who have sexually or financially exploited patients.28 Research suggests that from two to nine percent of physicians have had a sexual contact with a patient.29 There is even a book about physicians who were serial killers.50 I have never met such a physician or sat in judgment of one, however. I have never treated a...

The Destructive Pessary

Vaginal pessaries were commonly used in ancient Greece. These were wool tampons soaked in a variety of substances, including opium poppies, bitter almond oil, boiled honey, sea onion, ox marrow, goose fat, rose oil, thapsia root, myrtle, coriander, cumin, marjoram, bacchar (an aromatic root), perfumes, emetics, or other substances.5 The following is a typical account of the use of a therapeutic pessary The wife of Epicrates, who lay sick near the statue of the city founder, when near her...

Contending Interpretations

The great Hippocratic scholar Emile Littre was the first academician to tackle the meaning of this passage. He translated it as, I will not practice surgery for stone I will leave this to people who do that. His translation restricts the scope of the passage to surgery for stone rather than reading it as a general disavowal of surgery, especially surgery for stones. Though linguists do not accept the restrictive translation, many commentators tacitly accept it and narrowly debate the kind of...

The Greek Medical Ethics Of Abortion

Greek medical treatises on fetal development or viability did not describe the fetus as a person.43 Nor did Greek physicians describe embryos that they examined as a source of pollution in the sense that other human corpses were polluted.44 Child abandonment, at the discretion of the husband, was practiced to limit family size, select gender, or destroy deformed infants.45 For these reasons, it is difficult to read the Oath's words on destructive pessaries as a disavowal of abortion as killing...